Annotation: Jean and John Comaroff’s “Alien-Nation” (2002)

Peer-Review: 0

This annotation was written in reference to my paper: “Re-imagining Chang-rae Lee’s Native Speaker through the National Politics of Global Capitalism.” See my abstract here.

Comaroff, Jean and John Comaroff. “Alien-Nation: Zombies, Immigrants, and Millenial Capitalism.” The South Atlantic Quarterly 104.4 (2002): 779-805. Print.

In this article Jean and John Comaroff discuss how the prominent role of speculation in the current global capitalist economy, where capital seems to achieve an almost spectral “capacity to make its own vitality and increase seem independent of all human labor, to seem like the natural yield of exchange and consumption” (782). They suggest that the valuation of capital itself has led to the severe devaluation of human labor to the extent our modern condition gives rise to zombies. The Comaroffs present an anthropological study of post-Apartheid South Africa, drawing a connection between zombies and immigrants caught in the flows of global capitalism, where both are speech impaired (incapable of articulating their oppression) and forced to perform a kind of “ghost labor,” reduced to a mere instrument of production, the most lowly and unacknowledged occupation in an increasingly service and capital driven economy. They claim that the term zombies appropriately reflects the seemingly supernatural manner in which the rich are able to continuously consume and get richer without engaging in the conventional means of production themselves. While I am uncomfortable with the Camoroffs’ association of immigrants as zombies, which seems to deprive these individuals of any means of agency I would like to consider their discussion with respect to the spies in Native Speaker, particularly whether these “spooks” can also be conceived as zombies victimized by global capitalism.

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